THE INVISIBLE CHILDREN

Patrícia Reis manages to go farther (or closer) as she breaks down the tragedy into a specific identity, making the imperceptible of the visible emerge without complexes, and rescuing from indifference catalogued cases on whose justice people often pontificate.
 

The emotional spectrum drawn in the book raises questions such as how many families a child, protected or exposed behind a project of a name reduced to a capital letter, can embrace; or how many hours and how many lives a writer can recover from his days as a journalist stepping on crystals of time, so that it becomes mode and circumstance; or what it means to have a “real” family; or even what each person’s home is.

LUÍSA MELLID-FRANCO,

A REVISTA DO EXPRESSO
07/12/2019

She writes this fiction with the training of good journalists, the talent of true writers and an empathy that you can’t learn nor practice. The book takes on the children’s point of view, from cases that the author knew and investigated. The children have no gender – they are identified by initials – which means one will image them as one wishes, boys or girls, but rarely happy. Happiness, if it happens, is in the institution where they live (the House) and never in the houses where they go to, adopted by instant parents that never match the expectations that they claim, with the justification that children never live up to the fantasies that the adults construct. 

FILIPE SANTOS COSTA,

EXPRESSO
12/11/2019

CONSTRUCTION OF THE VOID

The attentive prose of Patrícia Reis suits the melancholic tone, a kind of sfumato.

JOSÉ MÁRIO SILVA, EXPRESSO
6/5/2017

We’re impressed by the crudity with which Patrícia Reis projects a film that disregards a logical and formal sequence – the crusade against the adverbs is only an example of the practice, an extensive one, of avoiding refinements that can soften a narrative that is intended to be dry and hard, even if the characters might suggest other solutions at first.

JOÃO GOBERN, DIÁRIO DE NOTÍCIAS
12/6/2017

Reveals a narrative maturity and resourcefulness which I dare say makes us completely forget writers who have won prizes.

EDUARDO PITTA, DA LITERATURA

She combines her ability to surprise us with the revelation of everything which has always inhabited our fears and uncertainties

LUÍSA MELLID-FRANCO, EXPRESSO

GRAMMAR OF FEAR

Grammar of Fear, by Maria Manuel Viana and Patrícia Reis, follows the idea of mystery and the detective's demand to subvert it and make it implode, in a surprising way, in a crescendo built with the subtle dexterity of Henry James in The Beast in the Jungle (it is no coincidence that the work is mentioned in the text). There is a double provocation which is implicit in this project: starting from the underestimated tradition of the detective novel to write a novel in which the motive of crime is the continuous, persistent, insidious underestimation of that half of Humanity constituted by the female human beings.

INÊS PEDROSA, COLÓQUIO

2016

WHAT SEPARATES US BECAUSE OF A GLASS OF WHISKY 

WINNER OF THE LYONS LITERARY PRIZE OF PORTUGAL

On reaching the twentieth page, you realise that you are inside a substantial proposal and, upon completion of the final one, you may conclude that you’ve just read a truly precious book. A short book, only 89 pages long which are read very quickly. Where to keep it? It’s very simple – “What Separates us Because of a Glass of Whisky” must be kept among the books of thin spine that last for a long reading time and force us to turn back. 

LÍDIA JORGE, COLÓQUIO
2014

Her new novel begins in Macao with the description of a non-existent meeting between a teacher and a barmaid. It is the pretext, a prodigious exercise of imagination about loss and unfulfilled destiny.

FRANCISCO JOSÉ VIEGAS,

CORREIO DA MANHÃ
05/10/14

COUNTERBODY

Is it the enemy lines that the children walk to? This battlefield between strangers connected through the most intimate bond is the territory of the seventh novel by Patrícia Reis, “Counter Body”.

SÍLVIA SOUTO CUNHA,

VISÃO
25/04/2013

THIS WORLD UPWARDS

Patrícia Reis’s most recent book is enthralling. The disaster is of this time. But it comes quietly, it seems not to disturb (...)

MARIA ALZIRA SEIXO,

JORNAL DE LETRAS
15/06/2011

In just a few years, Patrícia Reis (1970) has marked the territory of one’s own voice. “This World Upwards”, centred on a future whose contours are blurry, is the most ambitious of the seven novels she has published.

EDUARDO PITTA

SÁBADO
27/07/2011

Patrícia Reis, who clearly builds this book as something that is also left to the younger ones, her son, to start with, cures the delusions of childhood, and, although instinctively creating a fable, puts above all else the imperative of reaching the other, being here for the other, caring for the other, abbreviating distances, creating closeness.

VALTER HUGO MÃE

JORNAL DE LETRAS
13/07/2011

I, who have always imagined myself in despair and a suicide in a horror scenery, with no calling for a human cockroach, learn hope in Patrícia Reis’s book, which would never be complete without the topic, in which she is always magnificent, of gender. 

VALTER HUGO MÃE

JORNAL DE LETRAS

BEFORE BEING HAPPY

Patrícia Reis has plunged into the universe of Figueira da Foz, which she knew well from her youth, and wove an intelligent narrative about love

LUÍS SILVESTRE

SÁBADO

24/04/2010

Patricia Reis knows that art of writing, of passing on feelings, of making the reader feeling like a mirror of that inner world that she creates in fictions like Second Hand Love” (2004) or "Cross of the Souls" (2006). And now in "Before being happy".

ISABEL LUCAS

DIÁRIO ECONÓMICO

20/03/2010

IN THE SILENCE OF GOD

“In the Silence of God” is a story of two parallel solitudes, a portrait of two characters in search of a romance, a story that splits. In memories, melancholies, and mismatches.

MÁRIO SANTOS,

PÚBLICO
26/09/2008

Through the deserts of sorrow it is possible to reach that place where the silence of God breaks and the words that have lacked or hurt us suddenly gleam, with a transparency that poses as happiness. One writes with that in mind, although that is rarely achieved. Patrícia Reis has achieved it. She has written exactly that.

INÊS PEDROSA,

REVISTA LER
01/10/2008

BITE YOUR HEART

Writing is precisely the greatest merit of this short book, a kind of intersection of intimate thoughts, untidied in time, but not in feelings, arranged so as to speak of lives that are untidied in Earth’s Geography and in the events of History.

LÍDIA JORGE,

OS MEUS LIVROS
2007

This (small) book is precious (and rare) and must be handled with care, it contains emotions.

JOSÉ EDUARDO AGUALUSA,

COVER OF THE BOOK

SECOND HAND LOVE

Patrícia Reis [is a] writer who has been earning, book by book, a solid place in current Portuguese literature.

MIGUEL REAL,

JORNAL DE LETRAS